Description

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

In this interview, Peterson Zah

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

In this interview, Peterson Zah addresses Navajo history, both past and present. Numerous topics are discussed in this interview such as the beginning stages of the Navajo reservation, language and culture, women in Navajo politics, and old and new Navajo values. Zah commentates on matters pertaining to the Navajo Tribal Government, such as the Indian Reorganization Act, the history and issues of the Navajo Tribal Government, and its future. He mentions key individuals in Navajo history that contributed to the growth and well-being of the community, for example Annie Wauneka and Raymond Nakai. Zah also reflects on some of his greatest achievements while working at DNA People's Legal Services and as Tribal Chairman. Major achievements mentioned include the revamping of Apache County, the rising number of Navajo lawyers, and the creation of new high schools on the Navajo reservation, which ultimately led to the closing down of boarding schools. Zah gives details about significant precedent-setting cases that DNA People's Legal Services handled, such as the McClanahan v. the Arizona Tax Commission case.

Included in this item (2)


Details

Contributors
Agent
Date Created
2008-03-20
Identifier
  • Identifier Type
    Locally defined identifier
    Identifier Value
    2012-04590

Citation and reuse

Cite this item

This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

"Peterson Zah and Peter Iverson Interview, March 20, 2008" (2012-04590). Labriola National American Indian Data Center. Department of Archives and Special Collections. University Libraries. Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.

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