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ContributorsFrisch, Billy (Composer) / Lucas, Jimmy (Lyricist) / Broadway Music Corp. (Publisher)
Created1918
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ContributorsDaughtery, David (Contributor) / Garcia, Joseph (Contributor) / Morrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor)
Created2018-06-01
Description

While many potential voters care deeply about local and state issues, 45 percent of Arizona citizens of voting-age population did not vote in the last election, according to a report by Morrison Institute for Public Policy. To address this voter crisis, Arizona Clean Elections commissioned this report, the first in

While many potential voters care deeply about local and state issues, 45 percent of Arizona citizens of voting-age population did not vote in the last election, according to a report by Morrison Institute for Public Policy. To address this voter crisis, Arizona Clean Elections commissioned this report, the first in a series, to identify the reasons why only a little more than half of eligible voters actually are casting ballots in Arizona, as well as a first-of-its-kind knowledge bank of information on Arizona government to ensure that voters can vote in an informed manner.

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ContributorsGottsfield, Hon. R.L. (Contributor) / Hammond, Larry A. (Contributor) / Lee Elm, Donna (Contributor) / Morrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor)
Created2017-08-01
Description

The 2015 State of Our State Conference focused on criminal justice reform and included several white papers from various authors, researchers and legal officials from different perspectives. Here is the latest contribution in the series published by Morrison Institute for Public Policy as part of its ongoing effort to encourage

The 2015 State of Our State Conference focused on criminal justice reform and included several white papers from various authors, researchers and legal officials from different perspectives. Here is the latest contribution in the series published by Morrison Institute for Public Policy as part of its ongoing effort to encourage public dialogue on criminal justice issues. America is witnessing a growing national consensus that we should not be incarcerating nonviolent drug offenders, even those with prior drug convictions, who have not committed property crimes. Many other less-serious offenders could receive reduced sentences without threatening public safety. Even when offenders deserve incarceration, they may not have deserved the amount of time imposed – the punishment did not fit the crime. These are among the evidence-based arguments presented by three veteran attorneys in “Fixing Arizona’s Mass Incarceration Dilemma.” The paper’s authors are former Maricopa County Superior Court Judge R.L. Gottsfield, Phoenix attorney Larry A. Hammond, founder and president of the Arizona Justice Project, and former Maricopa County public defender Donna Elm. Touching on all aspects of the justice system, the authors assert that Arizona is behind the curve in addressing its mass incarceration problem. The importance of ignoring the direction the country is going cannot be understated for Arizona, which has one of the highest incarceration rates. It is even more unjustified in light of research indicating that shorter sentences do not jeopardize public safety – with safety being the mainstay basis for Arizona’s heavy sentencing regime.

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ContributorsMcFadden, Erica McFadden, Eric Hedberg (Contributor) / Hedberg, Eric (Contributor) / Morrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor)
Created2017-08-01
Description

Mobility is crucial to everyday life in rural and urban settings, and for individuals with disabilities and low-income populations public transportation can be a major obstacle to keeping them socially engaged. For some individuals, public transportation is their sole way to see a doctor, get groceries and maintain employment. A

Mobility is crucial to everyday life in rural and urban settings, and for individuals with disabilities and low-income populations public transportation can be a major obstacle to keeping them socially engaged. For some individuals, public transportation is their sole way to see a doctor, get groceries and maintain employment. A 2015 survey of individuals with developmental disabilities in 28 states found that Arizona is the worst when it comes to reliable transportation. What can Arizona do to increase funding and continually improve its transportation services? This report examines some avenues to mobility.

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Created2017-08-01
Description

A recent American Civil Liberties Union report found that Maricopa County elementary and middle school students with disabilities are twice as likely to be suspended compared to kids without disabilities. Another key factor in this discussion is the use of restraints and seclusion on students with disabilities as disciplinary action

A recent American Civil Liberties Union report found that Maricopa County elementary and middle school students with disabilities are twice as likely to be suspended compared to kids without disabilities. Another key factor in this discussion is the use of restraints and seclusion on students with disabilities as disciplinary action in schools. In 2016, state lawmakers revised Arizona Revised Statute Title 15-105 on the use of restraints and seclusion, requiring that schools document and report any restraint or seclusion used on students to the parent or guardian within 24 hours. This briefing paper looks at the definition of restraints and seclusion, as well as whether they are overused forms of punishment on students with disabilities.

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ContributorsMcFadden, Erica (Contributor) / Schlinkert, David (Contributor) / Morrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor)
Created2017-09-01
Description

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act mandates that all children with disabilities receive a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE). One of the biggest barriers to implementing FAPE in Arizona is inadequate funding, which has led to a shortage of well trained and qualified teachers.

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ContributorsMorrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor) / Arizona Town Hall (Contributor)
Created2015-05-01
Description
As Arizona pulls itself out of the deepest recession that it has faced since the Great Depression, this 105th Arizona Town Hall is convened to examine Arizona’s economy. In Arizona Town Hall’s fifty-two year history, this is the eleventh time citizens from across the state have come together to

As Arizona pulls itself out of the deepest recession that it has faced since the Great Depression, this 105th Arizona Town Hall is convened to examine Arizona’s economy. In Arizona Town Hall’s fifty-two year history, this is the eleventh time citizens from across the state have come together to reflect on the current state of Arizona’s economy and how best to shape its future.
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ContributorsBorns, Kristin (Contributor) / Morrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor)
Created2015-03-01
Description
This March 19, 2015 review of Arizona's state budget looks at the balancing act between fiscal responsibility and social investment in education and other public programs: In what felt like record time – far earlier than the normal 100-day target – the Arizona Legislature passed the first budget of Governor Doug

This March 19, 2015 review of Arizona's state budget looks at the balancing act between fiscal responsibility and social investment in education and other public programs: In what felt like record time – far earlier than the normal 100-day target – the Arizona Legislature passed the first budget of Governor Doug Ducey’s term. Its quick passage was hailed as an example of collaboration between the Governor and fellow Republican leadership, with the minority Democratic Party again unable to muster a meaningful role in the budget’s specifics or direction. The $9.1 billion budget, approved by both houses in a marathon overnight session, held close to much of what the Governor had proposed in taking office.
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ContributorsBorns, Kristin (Contributor) / Morrison Institute of Public Policy (Contributor)
Created2015-03-01
Description
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provided states the option to expand Medicaid coverage, which Arizona did with Governor Jan Brewer’s signature in June 2013. Despite clashing with members of her own Republican party, the then-governor pushed the bill through the Legislature to take advantage of federal incentives to

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provided states the option to expand Medicaid coverage, which Arizona did with Governor Jan Brewer’s signature in June 2013. Despite clashing with members of her own Republican party, the then-governor pushed the bill through the Legislature to take advantage of federal incentives to increase health care coverage for the poor. Although successful in its passage, the state’s Medicaid restoration law remains at risk. That’s because 36 GOP legislators opposed to the Medicaid eligibility expansion sued, and the issue is now in the courts.