Matching Items (18)

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Story of Grand Canyon of Arizona

Description

Booklet describing a geological survey of the Grand Canyon. Four editions: 1917, 1929, 1936, 1950.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
1917

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Graphics for Core-Complex Morphology and Geologic Continuous Casting

Description

The essential process in continuous casting is cooling and solidification of the cast medium during heat loss across a slip surface followed by extrusion from a mold. There are implications here for the manner in which core complexes form.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2009

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Carbon Sequestration Potential at the 1 Alpine-Federal Site in East-Central Arizona

Description

This open-file report describes the carbon-sequestration potential at the site of the 1 Alpine-Federal geothermal test drill hole, which is located south of Springerville in central eastern Arizona near the New Mexico border. A previous report, Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS)

This open-file report describes the carbon-sequestration potential at the site of the 1 Alpine-Federal geothermal test drill hole, which is located south of Springerville in central eastern Arizona near the New Mexico border. A previous report, Arizona Geological Survey (AZGS) Open-File Report OFR 94-1, version 2.0, describes the subsurface geology encountered in the 1 Alpine-Federal well in much more detail than this new report.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2009

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Geologic Characterization of the Black Hills Dam (Scottsdale, Arizona)

Description

The purpose of this research project is to determine the origin of the materials used to construct the Black Hills Dam in order to restore the landscape to pre-dam conditions. The Black Hills Dam site is located in northern Scottsdale,

The purpose of this research project is to determine the origin of the materials used to construct the Black Hills Dam in order to restore the landscape to pre-dam conditions. The Black Hills Dam site is located in northern Scottsdale, Maricopa County, at 33.75° North, 111.80° West. The goals of this project are to characterize the surficial deposits and local geology of the dam site. This report presents our findings, interpretations and conclusions based on background research, a site visit to the dam site, and technical discussions with the City of Scottsdale engineer and planners.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2009

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Delineating Post-Wildlife Debris Flow Hazards for Pre-Fire Mitigation, Pine and Strawberry, Arizona

Description

The goal of this study is to develop a method for identifying potential post-fire debris flow hazard areas prior to the occurrence of wildfires, providing more time for local governments and emergency planners to develop and execute hazard mitigation strategies.

The goal of this study is to develop a method for identifying potential post-fire debris flow hazard areas prior to the occurrence of wildfires, providing more time for local governments and emergency planners to develop and execute hazard mitigation strategies. This pilot study focuses on the communities of Pine and Strawberry, which are located in forested canyons at the base of the Mogollon Rim in north-central Arizona. Results from this project will provide local agencies, emergency planners and land managers more effective tools for prioritizing watershed treatment areas and implementing mitigation measures to alleviate potential impacts and threats from post-fire debris flows to infrastructure, human life, and property in a timely and cost-effective manner.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2008-06-30

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Geologic Mapping of Debris Flow Deposits in the Santa Catalina Mountains (Pima County, Arizona)

Description

In order to begin to assess debris‐flow hazards along the Santa Catalina Mountains in Pima County, we mapped the extent and character of relatively young prehistoric debris‐flow deposits in detail at fifteen
canyon mouths. Mapping was conducted on a scale

In order to begin to assess debris‐flow hazards along the Santa Catalina Mountains in Pima County, we mapped the extent and character of relatively young prehistoric debris‐flow deposits in detail at fifteen
canyon mouths. Mapping was conducted on a scale of 1:6,000 using aerial photographs, detailed
topography, and field relationships. Deposits were classified into relative age categories based on
topographic relationships, soil development and surface characteristics of the deposits. Ages of selected
debris‐flow deposits in four canyons – Soldier, Sabino, Finger Rock and Pima – were estimated using
radiocarbon (14C) and cosmogenic (10Be) isotope methods.

Evidence of past debris flows were found in all fifteen canyons. Relative age dating, corroborated by
10Be, indicates the largest and most extensive deposits in all canyons are late Pleistocene to early
Holocene in age. Events from 2006 show that some potential exists for debris flows to exit the mountain front into developed areas near canyon mouths.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2008-09

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Geology and Geological Hazards Field Trip of Sabino Canyon: Results of the July 2006 Storms

Description

This field trip guide was created for a Project WET conference held in Tucson, Arizona, June, 2007. This guide discusses the general geology of the Santa Catalina Mountains in Sabino Canyon, and points out evidence of the July 2006 floods

This field trip guide was created for a Project WET conference held in Tucson, Arizona, June, 2007. This guide discusses the general geology of the Santa Catalina Mountains in Sabino Canyon, and points out evidence of the July 2006 floods and debris flows. There are stops in the first few miles of canyon, and towards the end of the tram road, where the most spectacular debris flows are located.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2008-06

Fieldnotes: Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology/Arizona Bureau of Mines

Description

In March 1971, the Arizona Bureau of Mines—predecessor of today’s Arizona Geological Survey—published the first issue of Fieldnotes. For nearly 40 years, Fieldnotes, and its successor, Arizona Geology, showcased all things geologic in Arizona. From the onset, the quarterly magazine

In March 1971, the Arizona Bureau of Mines—predecessor of today’s Arizona Geological Survey—published the first issue of Fieldnotes. For nearly 40 years, Fieldnotes, and its successor, Arizona Geology, showcased all things geologic in Arizona. From the onset, the quarterly magazine printed topical pieces on Arizona’s mineral resources, energy potential, and environmental geology. In Fall 1988, Fieldnotes became Arizona Geology, and the newsletter was retailored to meet the needs of Arizona’s exploding population. There was increased focus on articles describing geologic phenomena—flash floods and regional floods, earthquakes, landslides, volcanism, swelling and shrinking soils, earth fissures, and more—with the most immediate and adverse impact on the lives and properties of our fellow Arizonans. But that was then and this is now! As print publication costs rise through the stratosphere, we simply can no longer afford to print and mail 4100 copies of Arizona Geology quarterly. Arizona Geology is going digital. We are suspending the print publication immediately and we are moving from a quarterly schedule to three times annually.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
1971 to 2008

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Surficial Geology and Fire in Southeastern Arizona Grasslands: Effects on Soil Geochemistry in Semiarid Ecosystems, Fort Huachuca Military Reservation, Arizona

Description

Throughout the southwestern United States, vegetation in what historically was grassland has changed to a mixture of trees and shrubs; exotic grass species and undesirable shrubs have also invaded the grasslands at the expense of native grasses. The availability and

Throughout the southwestern United States, vegetation in what historically was grassland has changed to a mixture of trees and shrubs; exotic grass species and undesirable shrubs have also invaded the grasslands at the expense of native grasses. The availability and amount of soil nutrients influence the relative success of plants, but few studies have examined fire effects on soil characteristics in a temporal, spatial, and species group-specific fashion. Likewise, few studies have tied fire effects and ecological aspects to the underlying geology. Our research investigates the effects of fire events on selected soil characteristics pH, nitrate (NO3-), plant-available phosphorus (PO4-3), and total organic carbon (TOC) on native grass-, exotic grass-, and mixed grass-dominated plots distributed on four different geological surfaces. Treated and control plots were sampled prior to burn treatment and at intervals after the burns. In addition to new geologic mapping of the study areas, results indicate the geologic substrate is the most important variable for explaining pH, NO3- and PO4-3 values in the soils. Dominant grass type – native, non-native, or mixed – had little effect on the response of soil geochemistry to fire events: post-burn results indicate vegetation was a significant factor only for TOC. Recovery to pre-burn levels varies with characteristic: there were no significant initial differences between vegetation types, but significant differences in NO3-, PO4-3, and TOC amounts occur as a result of fire events, geological characteristics, and time. The research helps identify the soil response to fire and the recovery times of soil characteristics, further defines which fire frequency is optimal as a management strategy to maximize soil macronutrient contents, and illustrates the important role geology plays in grassland ecosystems.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2006-06