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Peterson Zah and Peter Iverson Interview, December 5, 2007

Description

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

In this interview, Peterson Zah

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

In this interview, Peterson Zah reveals personal experiences about his childhood, the struggles of growing up, and how those experiences shaped his life today. Zah reflects on living close to Keams Canyon, trying to keep family traditions, farming, obtaining water, and the hardships of family going to war, scarcity of food and water, and having to relocate multiple times due to the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute. He recounts his personal experiences attending Tuba City Boarding School, Phoenix Indian School, Phoenix College, and finally Arizona State University. Zah recalls various aspects of his education including his class schedules and routine at Tuba City Boarding School and the goal of Phoenix Indian School being more concerned about vocational training than college preparation. He also takes a moment to address his mentors that helped him throughout the different stages of his education.

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2007-12-05

Peterson Zah and Peter Iverson Interview, October 12, 2007

Description

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

The experiences Peterson Zah touches

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

The experiences Peterson Zah touches on in this interview include his early encounters with traders as a young child in the 1940s, his work at the DNA People’s Legal Services program in the late 1960s, and his involvement in the non-profit organization Southwest Indian Development Inc. in the 1970s and 1980s. Zah focuses on the topic of traders and trading posts on the Navajo Nation. He discusses the growing problems created by unfair traders and how his collaboration with nine Navajo college students to create Southwest Indian Development Inc. allowed for things to change for the better. Zah recalls the dedication of the organization to provide research and compelling reports to the Trading Post Committee of the Navajo tribal council and the Bureau of Indian Affairs in order to amend the trading issues. He also discusses the hearing that the Federal Trade Commission conducted once the Southwest Indian Development Inc. requested their presence after being brushed off by the Navajo tribal council and the BIA. The interview concludes with Zah explaining the role that the DNA People’s Legal Services played in the whole trader controversy and how the actions of the Southwest Indian Development Inc. allowed for shopping centers and post offices to replace shady traders and trading posts.

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2007-10-12

Peterson Zah and Peter Iverson Interview, September 19, 2007

Description

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

In this interview, Peterson Zah

From 2007 until 2010, Dr. Peterson Zah and Dr. Peter Iverson met in the Labriola National American Indian Data Center to record talks for their new book We Will Secure Our Future: Empowering the Navajo Nation.

In this interview, Peterson Zah discusses the important legal impact that the DNA People’s Legal Services program had on the Navajo Nation. He gives details from its conception in 1967, to how the program was named, its goals, and the controversies surrounding it. Zah recounts his experiences working in the DNA People’s Legal Services, especially his hand in the construction of the office buildings, recruiting new lawyers, and getting Navajo students excited about pursuing a career in law. The second half of the interview focuses mostly on a few influential, political individuals that gave the Navajo legal council or ran for tribal chairmanship. Zah and Iverson both give insight and historical details about Norman Littell, John Boyden, Raymond Nakai, and Peter MacDonald.

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2007-09-19