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Created2004 to 2017
Description

This document provides information on the types of activities supported and the categories or characteristics of individuals served under the provisions of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, Public Law 97-35, Subtitle C - Block Grants for Social Services, which amends Title XX of the Social Security Act. The

This document provides information on the types of activities supported and the categories or characteristics of individuals served under the provisions of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, Public Law 97-35, Subtitle C - Block Grants for Social Services, which amends Title XX of the Social Security Act. The Arizona Department of Economic Security under the statutory provisions of the law administers the Arizona Social Services Block Grant Plan. The program period covered corresponds to the State Fiscal Year, which begins on July 1, and ends June 30. State Fiscal Year overlaps portions of previous Federal Fiscal Year, which runs from October 1 through September 30.

Created2005 to 2008
Description

Healthy Families Arizona is a voluntary, home visitation program, aimed at the prevention of child abuse and neglect. This secondary prevention program is targeted to the parents of newborns with risk factors that make them vulnerable to child abuse and neglect, and at risk of parent/child relationship and child development

Healthy Families Arizona is a voluntary, home visitation program, aimed at the prevention of child abuse and neglect. This secondary prevention program is targeted to the parents of newborns with risk factors that make them vulnerable to child abuse and neglect, and at risk of parent/child relationship and child development problems. The risk factors that qualify parents for the program include parental history of abuse and neglect; substance abuse; mental health problems; poor coping skills; a lack of social support; unrealistic developmental expectations of infants and toddlers, difficulty with bonding and attachment; attitudes favorable toward harsh discipline; anger management issues; and a lack of resources to meet basic needs. Modeled on the Healthy Families America program, Healthy Families began in Arizona in 1991 with two sites. Administered by the Arizona Department of Economic Security, Healthy Families Arizona has realized considerable growth over the years, and is now available to families statewide. As with any considerable investment in cost and effort, the question of return is central to ongoing support of the Healthy Families Arizona program. Does the Healthy Families Arizona program (a) reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect; (b) lead to better health and development for children, and (c) does it enhance parent/child relationships? The longitudinal evaluation of Healthy Families Arizona was designed to answer these questions.

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Created2004-09
Description

Although there are several adoption agencies in Arizona, the Department of Economic Security is the largest. Almost without exception, the children placed by DES have special needs; that is, they may be older or have physical or emotional handicaps. The information presented here is based on DES’ statewide adoption program.

Although there are several adoption agencies in Arizona, the Department of Economic Security is the largest. Almost without exception, the children placed by DES have special needs; that is, they may be older or have physical or emotional handicaps. The information presented here is based on DES’ statewide adoption program. This pamphlet has been prepared to answer some of the most frequently asked questions about adoption.

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Created2008-10
Description

Arizona physicians with expertise in prenatal substance abuse, Child Protective Services, Arizona Department of Health Services, Indian Health Services, and hospital social services have come together to develop a consistent approach to identifying substance-exposed newborns. Based on extensive medical literature review, review of other state guidelines, and input from Arizona

Arizona physicians with expertise in prenatal substance abuse, Child Protective Services, Arizona Department of Health Services, Indian Health Services, and hospital social services have come together to develop a consistent approach to identifying substance-exposed newborns. Based on extensive medical literature review, review of other state guidelines, and input from Arizona hospital newborn programs, this committee drafted these guidelines.

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Created2004-12
Description

Kinship Foster Care is a Child Protective Services program that seeks relatives as the caregivers for children. This brochure explains what it takes to be considered for a Kinship Foster Care placement, and what services are available through CPS.

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Created2004-12-31
Description

The revision is a separate document to the Arizona Regional Haze State Implementation Plan submitted December 2003. The Revision meets specific commitments outlined in the December 2003 SIP (Enclosures 2 through 7) as well as a correction to the authorizing regional haze statutes. The submittal contains a SIP completeness checklist

The revision is a separate document to the Arizona Regional Haze State Implementation Plan submitted December 2003. The Revision meets specific commitments outlined in the December 2003 SIP (Enclosures 2 through 7) as well as a correction to the authorizing regional haze statutes. The submittal contains a SIP completeness checklist and seven enclosures.

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Created2002-06
Description

This document includes an attainment demonstration and formal request to the United States Environmental Agency to redesignate the San Manuel, Arizona area, a nonattainment area for sulfur dioxide (SO2), to attainment for the health-based 24-hour average and annual average SO2 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). It summarizes the progress

This document includes an attainment demonstration and formal request to the United States Environmental Agency to redesignate the San Manuel, Arizona area, a nonattainment area for sulfur dioxide (SO2), to attainment for the health-based 24-hour average and annual average SO2 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). It summarizes the progress of the area in attaining the SO2 standard, demonstrates that all Clean Air Act requirements for attainment have been adopted, and includes a maintenance plan to assure continued attainment after redesignation.

Created2005-06
Description

In a rule published July 2, 2002, EPA found the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality’s "Plan for Attainment of the 24-Hour PM10 Standard – Maricopa County PM10 Nonattainment Area" (May 1997), inadequate to achieve attainment of the 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter 10 microns or fewer

In a rule published July 2, 2002, EPA found the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality’s "Plan for Attainment of the 24-Hour PM10 Standard – Maricopa County PM10 Nonattainment Area" (May 1997), inadequate to achieve attainment of the 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter 10 microns or fewer in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) at the Salt River monitoring site. The 1997 ADEQ SIP revision included attainment and Reasonable Further Progress demonstrations for the 24-hour NAAQS at the Salt River air quality monitoring site of the Maricopa County PM10 Serious Nonattainment Area, as well as at three other monitoring sites in the Phoenix area, - the Maryvale, Gilbert, and West Chandler sites. On August 4, 1997, EPA approved ADEQ’s attainment and RFP demonstrations for the Salt River monitoring area, which showed that the 24-hour PM10 NAAQS would reach attainment in the area by May 1998. Due to continuing violations of the 24-hour PM10 NAAQS at the Salt River air quality monitoring site since May 1998, EPA subsequently required Arizona to submit a revision to correct SIP inadequacies. This document consists of Arizona’s revisions to the state implementation plan for the Maricopa County PM10 Serious Nonattainment Area as described by EPA in its Federal Register notice of disapproval.

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Created2008-06
Description

The Clean Air Act states that an area designated as nonattainment due to a violation of the NAAQS may be redesignated to attainment if the State submits and EPA approves a plan demonstrating that permanent emission controls that resulted in attainment will remain in place. This plan demonstrates that all

The Clean Air Act states that an area designated as nonattainment due to a violation of the NAAQS may be redesignated to attainment if the State submits and EPA approves a plan demonstrating that permanent emission controls that resulted in attainment will remain in place. This plan demonstrates that all CAA requirements for attainment and maintenance have been met and summarizes the progress of the area in attaining the PM10 standard. This document includes a formal request to EPA to redesignate the Rillito, Arizona PM10 nonattainment area to attainment for the health-based 24-hour average PM10 NAAQS.

Created2003-12-23
Description

The Arizona State Implementation Plan describes the programs that the State will rely upon to make reasonable progress toward “preventing any future and … remedying any existing impairment of visibility” in the large parks and wilderness areas in Arizona and those in other states that may be affected by pollution

The Arizona State Implementation Plan describes the programs that the State will rely upon to make reasonable progress toward “preventing any future and … remedying any existing impairment of visibility” in the large parks and wilderness areas in Arizona and those in other states that may be affected by pollution generated in Arizona (Class I areas). The federal regional haze rules require states to develop and submit SIPs for improving visibility through the year 2018 that make reasonable progress toward achieving “natural visibility conditions” by the year 2064. This plan is designed to adopt the basic visibility program that addresses impairment of visibility that can be traced to older major industrial sources and implements recommendations adopted by the Grand Canyon Visibility Transport Commission in its 1996 report to EPA.