Matching Items (89)
78697-Thumbnail Image.png
Created1858-11-27
Description
This group of documents pertain to the disappearance of 14 Chinese settlers and their cedulas, and the search that ensued to locate them and return them to their owners. A claim was made by the owners of the cedulas- D. Antonio and Eduardo Betancourt, on November 27, 1858. Various authority

This group of documents pertain to the disappearance of 14 Chinese settlers and their cedulas, and the search that ensued to locate them and return them to their owners. A claim was made by the owners of the cedulas- D. Antonio and Eduardo Betancourt, on November 27, 1858. Various authority figures in several of the Cuban towns responded to the report and promised to keep an active search, and to remain in constant communication regarding the missing 14 settlers. However, it was later established within the reports that D. Antonio Betancourt had provided fraudulent contracts about the 14 settlers, and he was therefore arrested and held in prison. After appealing for his freedom, D. Antonio Betancourt was released from the prison, el Castillo de la Punta, on February, 15, 1859.
78713-Thumbnail Image.png
Created1855
Description

Letter from the Captain General, stating what should be filled on the identity cards of Chinese settlers. 1855.

78733-Thumbnail Image.png
Created1865
DescriptionDeath record of Bartolome, a Chinese settler who died from pulmonary consumption. 1865.
78735-Thumbnail Image.png
Created1864
Description

The cedula or an identity record for a Chinese settler, Francisco. He was brought from Soltero, China to Cuba to work for M. B. Pereda for eight years. Then, his contract was transferred to R. A. Leull for an additional eight years. 1864.

78736-Thumbnail Image.png
Created1865
DescriptionAn identity card, or cedula, for Capruto, originally from Soltero. Capruto worked for Josefa Carbonell.
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Created1871-04-15
Description
This is a request for a certificate of naturalization that was made by a Chinese settler named Agustin Cisneros. According to the handwritten request form (which begins on page six), Agustin had already been granted his carta de domicilio, or permanent residence card, five years prior to this request. The

This is a request for a certificate of naturalization that was made by a Chinese settler named Agustin Cisneros. According to the handwritten request form (which begins on page six), Agustin had already been granted his carta de domicilio, or permanent residence card, five years prior to this request. The document also reveals that Agustin was married to a woman named Lorenza Pastor, had four children with his wife, had been baptized, and worked as a cook. The document proceeding the official request for naturalization is the death certificate of Lorenza Pastor, which was signed on September 14, 1871. The next document is the marriage certificate that belonged to Agustin and Lorenza that was signed on June 18, 1870. The consecutive documents in this selection consist of supporting materials and documents that were used in his application for naturalization. Interviews with two of Agustin's past owners were conducted to gather evidence of Agustin's good conduct, work ethic, and intentions, and the transcribed interviews were included in the application. The landlords who were interviewed were Francisco Angela and Ramon Cueto. A cedula and the carta de domicilio that belonged to Agustin were presented in the packet, but caused some controversy because they contained the name Ricardo Cisneros as opposed to Agustin Cisneros. He was interviewed by officials so that they could understand why the documents had a different name other than his own, and to verify that he was not stealing some other person's documents to support his case. Agustin informed them that before he was baptized with the name Agustin Cisneros, he was called Ricardo by every person that he ever knew since arriving in Cuba. His request was subsequently accepted, and his carta de naturalizacion, or naturalization certificate, was signed on January 5, 1872.
78620-Thumbnail Image.png
Created1864
DescriptionThis is a neighborhood identity card (cedula) that belonged to Francisco- a Chinese settler, who was 33 years old, and in the process of completing his eight year labor contract as an indentured servant working for a railroad company at the time that the ID card was issued. 1864.
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Created1867-04-15
DescriptionAn identity card or cedula for Bruno. Bruno was 29 years old when this card was issued.
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Created1864-12-16
Description

This is an identity card, known as a cedula, that was issued for a Chinese settler named Lucas. At the time that this cedula was assigned to Lucas, he was 29 years old, and in the process of completing his eight year contract as an indentured servant. The names of

This is an identity card, known as a cedula, that was issued for a Chinese settler named Lucas. At the time that this cedula was assigned to Lucas, he was 29 years old, and in the process of completing his eight year contract as an indentured servant. The names of two of his past landlords and his current one were listed on the cedula. Originally, when he arrived in Cuba, his contract had been transferred to M. B. Pereda who then transferred the contract to Juan Peyra. Jose M. Criado was Lucas's present owner at the time that this cedula was issued. Havana, 1865.

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Created1864-12-16
DescriptionA identity card or, cedula, for Prisciliano. He was 70 years old when this card was issued.,