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Marriage Report

Description

Relates that Leonardo Sanchez, a permanent resident of Cuba and a baptized Catholic, married Marcelina Diaz. She was born in Matanzas and they had two daughters, who were both baptized and registered in the book for those of European descent

Relates that Leonardo Sanchez, a permanent resident of Cuba and a baptized Catholic, married Marcelina Diaz. She was born in Matanzas and they had two daughters, who were both baptized and registered in the book for those of European descent in their parish church. Report concerns whether or not their children, who were of "mixed race," could be considered white, determined by which book their baptisms are recorded in. Churches would use different books for Europeans, whites, and minorities.

Created

Date Created
1864-02-29

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Cedula

Description

This is a neighborhood identity card (cedula) that belonged to Francisco- a Chinese settler, who was 33 years old, and in the process of completing his eight year labor contract as an indentured servant working for a railroad company at the time that the ID card was issued. 1864.

Created

Date Created
1864

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Contract

Description

This is a second labor contract between a Chinese settler named Agapito, and his owner, another Chinese settler, named Pedro Delgado. The term of the contract was for one year. 1868. Signed by the governor of Cuba and in Chinese by Agapito and Pedro Delgado.

Created

Date Created
1868-09-14

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Marriage Regulations

Description

Relates the marriage restrictions that were imposed in all of the settled communities. Several mixed marriages were either suspended or annulled by the government and the churches.

Created

Date Created
1806-04-02

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Complaint

Description

A complaint filed by Francisco Orta in the name of three Chinese settlers, Francisco, Manuel, and Pablo, concerning their contracts.

Created

Date Created
1861

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Contract

Description

This is a first contract between Francisco, a Chinese settler, and Miguel Alfonia in March 1864.

Created

Date Created
1864

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Contract

Description

A contract between Francisco, a Chinese settler, and Juan Ocarco y Arango. The contract was to last for a year and lists the legal requirements of both the employee and the employer. Francisco did not negotiate or sign the contract

A contract between Francisco, a Chinese settler, and Juan Ocarco y Arango. The contract was to last for a year and lists the legal requirements of both the employee and the employer. Francisco did not negotiate or sign the contract as the signature stipulates that someone else signed for him. Signed by Fermin Franco, Manuel Ruiz, Vicente, and Julio.

Created

Date Created
1869-08-09

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Shipping Records

Description

Records for the ship Granvilles, which brought Chinese settlers from China to Cuba under contract with Y. M. Zangroniz y Compania. On this trip, the Granvilles brought workers from China to work as field workers.

Created

Date Created
1866-10-03

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Marriage Report

Description

Relates that the civil government regulated the ability of Chinese settlers to marry. If they possessed a cedula, or identity record (meaning they were legally employed in Cuba, but had not yet become a permanent resident), they needed permission to

Relates that the civil government regulated the ability of Chinese settlers to marry. If they possessed a cedula, or identity record (meaning they were legally employed in Cuba, but had not yet become a permanent resident), they needed permission to marry anyone who was considered to be of a different race. Chinese settlers could only marry other Chinese settlers without permission.

Created

Date Created
1865-05-11

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Marriage Report

Description

Relates that the civil government regulated the ability of Chinese settlers to marry. If they possessed a cedula, or identity record (meaning they were legally employed in Cuba, but had not yet become a permanent resident), they needed permission to

Relates that the civil government regulated the ability of Chinese settlers to marry. If they possessed a cedula, or identity record (meaning they were legally employed in Cuba, but had not yet become a permanent resident), they needed permission to marry anyone who was considered to be of a different race. Chinese settlers could only marry other Chinese settlers without permission.

Created

Date Created
1865-03-31