Matching Items (10)

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Mapping Pima County, AZ

Description

Presents a very broad overview of the history of mapping of Pima County and surrounding areas used in the SDCP for a multitude of purposes.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2002-08

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Granite Gorge

Description

Detailed map of Granite Gorge section of the Grand Canyon from the pamphlet titled, "Titan of Chasms: Grand Canyon of Arizona."

Contributors

Created

Date Created
1905

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Grand Canyon National Park Map Proposed Boundaries

Description

Map of Grand Canyon National Park with hand-colored boundary lines, includes water tank locations.

Created

Date Created
1925

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Memorandum for the Press Regarding National Park and Forest Boundaries

Description

Press release announcing boundary adjustments for Grand Canyon National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Mount Rainier National Park and Sequoia National Park.

Created

Date Created
1925-10-31

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Kaibab National Forest Map

Description

Color map of the Grand Canyon National Park proposed boundaries with animal habitat zones identified for deer, mountain lion and mountain sheep.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
1917

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Characterizing and Mapping Potential Jaguar Habitat in Arizona

Description

The southwestern United States and Sonora, Mexico are the extreme northern limits of the jaguar’s (Panthera onca) range, which primarily extends from central Mexico south through Central and South America to northern Argentina. Recently, the jaguar ranged as far north

The southwestern United States and Sonora, Mexico are the extreme northern limits of the jaguar’s (Panthera onca) range, which primarily extends from central Mexico south through Central and South America to northern Argentina. Recently, the jaguar ranged as far north as Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Over the last century, the jaguar’s range has been reduced to approximately 46% of its historic range due to hunting pressure and habitat loss. The greatest loss of occupied range has occurred in the southern United States, northern Mexico, northern Brazil, and southern Argentina. Since 1900, jaguars have been documented occasionally in the southwestern United States, but the number of sightings per decade has declined over the last 100 years with only 4 verified sightings between 1970 and 2000. The objectives of our analysis were twofold: (1) characterize potential jaguar habitat in Arizona from historic sighting records, and (2) create a statewide habitat suitability map.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2003-01