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Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030: Map 25 - Major Plan Amendment

Description

An update to the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 (FRP30), to bring its Road Network Illustration (Map 25) into compliance with Arizona Revised Statute requirements and to resolve inconsistencies between Map 25 and parts of the Flagstaff City Code. This update

An update to the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 (FRP30), to bring its Road Network Illustration (Map 25) into compliance with Arizona Revised Statute requirements and to resolve inconsistencies between Map 25 and parts of the Flagstaff City Code. This update does not alter the intent of FRP30; it is only concerned with correcting errors, removing legal vulnerability, and improving the readability of FRP30.

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Created

Date Created
2015-11-12

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Tenth Grade Students' Perceptions of Career Preparation and Work Experience in Arizona Schools

Description

One component of a multi-faceted evaluation of the state's STW initiative involves surveying tenth grade students. Thus, the survey was designed to assess the extent to which Arizona tenth grade students have selected career majors, planned a course of study

One component of a multi-faceted evaluation of the state's STW initiative involves surveying tenth grade students. Thus, the survey was designed to assess the extent to which Arizona tenth grade students have selected career majors, planned a course of study for high school and beyond, and received adult guidance related to careers. As part of the evaluation, the intent was to look at the extent to which career preparation and work experiences truly are system-wide and impact students. In contrast, the purpose was not to evaluate whether STW program participants are receiving school-based learning components.

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Created

Date Created
1997-07

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Tenth Grade Students' Perceptions of Career Preparation and Work Experience in Arizona Schools: Two-Year Trends

Description

In spring 1998, 1,057 10th-grade students were surveyed as one component of a statewide evaluation of Arizona's school-to-work system designed by the Morrison Institute for Public Policy. This second survey measured attitudes toward and participation in career activities. Results were

In spring 1998, 1,057 10th-grade students were surveyed as one component of a statewide evaluation of Arizona's school-to-work system designed by the Morrison Institute for Public Policy. This second survey measured attitudes toward and participation in career activities. Results were compared to baseline data collected from over 2,000 10th-grade students in 1997. Data indicated that, in both years, nearly all students had at least an idea of their career area of interest; gender differences were observed in students' selections of career interests. Student participation in activities increased. Statistically significant differences in participation by sex were evident: more girls reported learning about careers in class and participating in volunteer activities; and more boys participated in internships with pay, worked for pay in a job unrelated to their careers, and had business mentors. The share of students who had selected a career interest increased as participation rose. All 14 activities were at least "somewhat" helpful to students in making career selections. In both years, students ranked family, teachers, and friends most highly as influencing career interests. One-fourth of students in 1998 compared to one-third of students in 1997 indicated they never received career guidance at school. Less than one-half of students were aware of courses related to career interests; even fewer actually took a course related to their interests.

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Created

Date Created
1998-11

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Ensuring the Safety of Students in School to Work Activities: Who's Liable?

Description

The School-to-Work (STW) Opportunities Act of 1994 promotes the development of statewide systems that support workforce and economic development through changes in the ways that students are educated. Jointly funded by the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education, the Act

The School-to-Work (STW) Opportunities Act of 1994 promotes the development of statewide systems that support workforce and economic development through changes in the ways that students are educated. Jointly funded by the U.S. Departments of Labor and Education, the Act emphasizes school-based and work-based learning and activities designed to connect the two. In order to fulfill the Act’s work-based learning component, employers are recruited to work with students. Recruitment efforts have generated questions from employers concerning their obligations and legal responsibilities should they become involved in STW programs. This paper attempts to clarify these issues.

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Created

Date Created
1998-03

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Differences in Public Understanding of and Reactions to GSPED Based on Urban-Rural Residency

Description

In the spring of 1998, the Office of Workforce Development Policy (OWDP) of the Arizona Department of Commerce commissioned a statewide opinion poll to assess public attitudes toward the state’s plan for economic development as implemented through GSPED — the

In the spring of 1998, the Office of Workforce Development Policy (OWDP) of the Arizona Department of Commerce commissioned a statewide opinion poll to assess public attitudes toward the state’s plan for economic development as implemented through GSPED — the Governor’s Strategic Partnership for Economic Development. The poll was designed to assess both the public’s understanding of GSPED and their reactions to using the concept of industry clusters as a tool for organizing both economic and workforce development efforts.

One question posed by members of the Governors’ Council on Workforce Development Policy pertained
to whether polling results vary by urban versus rural residency. Specifically, the question was raised as to whether the responses of rural residents differ from those who live in urban areas. Therefore, at the request of the Council, results of the polling were analyzed in order to answer the question: Does urban versus rural residency affect respondents' answers? The answer to this question is, in short, No.

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Created

Date Created
1998-11

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Differences in Public Understanding of and Reactions to GSPED Based on Awareness of the Initiative

Description

In the spring of 1998, the Office of Workforce Development Policy (OWDP) of the Arizona Department of Commerce commissioned a statewide opinion poll to assess public attitudes toward the state’s plan for economic development as implemented through GSPED — the

In the spring of 1998, the Office of Workforce Development Policy (OWDP) of the Arizona Department of Commerce commissioned a statewide opinion poll to assess public attitudes toward the state’s plan for economic development as implemented through GSPED — the Governor’s Strategic Partnership for Economic Development. The poll was designed to assess both the public’s understanding of GSPED and their reactions to using the concept of industry clusters as a tool for organizing both economic and workforce development efforts.

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Created

Date Created
1998-11

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Comprehensive Services in Arizona Schools: A Research and Planning Primer

Description

In preparation for new federal legislation that promotes unprecedented levels of comprehensive planning and service integration at state and local levels, an analysis of state issues relevant to comprehensive service delivery is necessary. This paper examines such state issues, with

In preparation for new federal legislation that promotes unprecedented levels of comprehensive planning and service integration at state and local levels, an analysis of state issues relevant to comprehensive service delivery is necessary. This paper examines such state issues, with a focus on Arizona's at-risk population, and presents a framework for comprehensive service delivery. It provides the rationale for such service delivery, summarizes the literature on research-based practices, illustrates district approaches to comprehensive service delivery, and sets forth guidelines for developing a comprehensive plan. System components of an effective plan are discussed in detail--student education, parent/family involvement, social/economic services, health services, and professional development. Five general principles underlie success: philosophy, people, processes, promising practices, and partners. Recommendations for developing comprehensive service delivery programs include the following: (1) build on existing information; (2) consolidate knowledge; and (3) think long-term. Contains 11 figures and over 250 references. Appendices contain information on Arizona practitioners' views and an illustration of a side-by-side program analysis.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
1994-09

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Public Perceptions of School to Work: Baseline Results

Description

In spring 1996, a statewide public poll was conducted to establish baseline measures of public attitudes toward school to work prior to its widespread implementation in Arizona schools. Findings indicated that although 83 percent of administrators had heard something about

In spring 1996, a statewide public poll was conducted to establish baseline measures of public attitudes toward school to work prior to its widespread implementation in Arizona schools. Findings indicated that although 83 percent of administrators had heard something about STW, more than half of the teachers and 7 of 10 parents and businesses had heard nothing. All constituent groups were uniformly high in terms of their support for all five proposed changes that could result from STW.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
1996-08

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Public Perceptions of School to Work: First Year Progress

Description

In spring 1997, Arizona repeated a spring 1996 statewide public poll that established baseline measures of public attitudes toward school-to-work (STW). Samples were drawn from three constituent groups: parents, businesses, and educators. Over 2,700 Arizonans participated each year. Overall awareness

In spring 1997, Arizona repeated a spring 1996 statewide public poll that established baseline measures of public attitudes toward school-to-work (STW). Samples were drawn from three constituent groups: parents, businesses, and educators. Over 2,700 Arizonans participated each year. Overall awareness of STW was up significantly among every group. The belief that local schools were involved increased, but many parents, businesses, and teachers still said their schools were not involved or they were unsure.

In both studies, a majority of educators rated the overall quality of education positively, whereas parents and businesses were more moderate in their ratings. Well over 90 percent of all groups said some degree of change was needed. Almost 90 percent of each group advocated that schools teach more than just basic skills. Three-quarters or more of all groups supported changing teachers' duties to emphasize instruction in teamwork, work habits, and work-related concerns; ensuring more collaboration in program and curriculum design; providing more comprehensive learning programs; providing "Career Majors"; and creating student employment opportunities.

Two beliefs pervaded the emerging STW system: the state must do a better job of identifying and serving special populations and not everyone is optimistic STW will succeed. Over half of all groups would be willing to pay additional taxes to support STW programs and all groups would vote for candidates supportive of STW.

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Created

Date Created
1997-07

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Improving Mathematics and Science Education in Arizona: Recommendations for the Eisenhower Higher Education Program

Description

Regents to request a study to improve the development and dissemination of grants that are funded by the higher education portion of the Eisenhower Act. The results of that evaluation are presented in three parts. Part 1 reviews the reform

Regents to request a study to improve the development and dissemination of grants that are funded by the higher education portion of the Eisenhower Act. The results of that evaluation are presented in three parts. Part 1 reviews the reform efforts in mathematics and science education, the need to improve students' mathematics and science skills, and trends in mathematics and science K-12 education. Part 2 looks at the role of the state's institutions of higher education (IHE) Eisenhower programs, presents the methodology of the study, gives a history of Arizona's IHE Eisenhower Program, and discusses project questions and answers. Part 3 presents and discusses the nine recommendations related to full-time administrative staff; distribution and revision of requests for proposals; revision of the grant application review process; a coherent strategy for state-level IHE program evaluation; dissemination of effective mathematics and science education training programs; grant writing assistance and feedback; and coordination with the Arizona Department of Education. Ten appendices contain names of interviewees, interview and survey responses, perspectives from other states, analysis of Arizona Eisenhower RFPs, a list of Arizona IHE Eisenhower programs (1990-1993), federal regulations governing IHE Eisenhower Programs, and preliminary recommendations.

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Created

Date Created
1993-06