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Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030: Map 25 - Major Plan Amendment

Description

An update to the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 (FRP30), to bring its Road Network Illustration (Map 25) into compliance with Arizona Revised Statute requirements and to resolve inconsistencies between Map 25 and parts of the Flagstaff City Code. This update

An update to the Flagstaff Regional Plan 2030 (FRP30), to bring its Road Network Illustration (Map 25) into compliance with Arizona Revised Statute requirements and to resolve inconsistencies between Map 25 and parts of the Flagstaff City Code. This update does not alter the intent of FRP30; it is only concerned with correcting errors, removing legal vulnerability, and improving the readability of FRP30.

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Created

Date Created
2015-11-12

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Aggregate Sources for Construction and Maintenance in Northern Arizona

Description

This study focuses on potential sources within a 10-mile-wide band along the existing interstates, U.S. highways, and state routes within the five-county project area.

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Created

Date Created
2014-04

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Land Use and Traffic Congestion

Description

Land Use and Traffic Congestion is an investigation into the links among land use, travel behavior, and traffic congestion. Researchers focused on four transportation corridors in the Phoenix area: three older neighborhoods with relatively mixed, higher density land use, and

Land Use and Traffic Congestion is an investigation into the links among land use, travel behavior, and traffic congestion. Researchers focused on four transportation corridors in the Phoenix area: three older neighborhoods with relatively mixed, higher density land use, and one suburban area with lower density but high traffic volumes. The analysis suggested that the higher density corridors exhibited less congestion due to the greater mix of uses, shorter trip lengths, more travel by transit and non-motorized modes, and the presence of a secondary street grid system.

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Created

Date Created
2012-03

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Performance Evaluation of Arizona's LTPP SPS-9 Project: Strategic Study of Rehabilitation of Flexible Pavement Binder Factors

Description

As part of the Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) Program, the Arizona Department of Transportation constructed eight Specific Pavement Studies 9 (SPS‐9) test sections on Interstate 10 near Phoenix is an overlay project and is accordingly given independent analysis and

As part of the Long Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) Program, the Arizona Department of Transportation constructed eight Specific Pavement Studies 9 (SPS‐9) test sections on Interstate 10 near Phoenix is an overlay project and is accordingly given independent analysis and documentation in this report separate from Arizona SPS‐9B projects located on US 93, which were new construction and are documented in a separate report. The SPS‐9A project studied the effect of asphalt specification and mix designs on flexible pavements, specifically comparing Superpave binders with commonly used agency binders. Opened to traffic in 1995, the project was monitored at regular intervals until it was rehabilitated in 2005. Surface distress, profile, and deflection data collected throughout the life of the pavement were used to evaluate the performance of various flexible pavement design features, layer configurations, and thickness. This report documents the analyses conducted as well as practical findings and lessons learned that will be of interest to ADOT.

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Created

Date Created
2015-06

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Effects of Deicing/Anti-Icing Chemicals on Rubberized Asphalt Pavements

Description

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of typical chemical winter maintenance practices on Arizona Department of Transportation pavements. A review of previous studies on the effect of deicing/anti‐icing chemicals did not yield definitive recommendations, especially for

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of typical chemical winter maintenance practices on Arizona Department of Transportation pavements. A review of previous studies on the effect of deicing/anti‐icing chemicals did not yield definitive recommendations, especially for DIAICs typically used by ADOT. Researchers conducted a laboratory study evaluating the effects of magnesium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, and distilled water on eight different open‐graded rubber‐modified asphalt concrete mixes using the boiling test. All experimental factors were found to be statistically significant, and the researchers provide recommendations on which DIAICs should be used for different binder and aggregate types.

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Created

Date Created
2014-09

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Arizona Transportation History

Description

The Arizona transportation history project was conceived in anticipation of Arizona’s centennial, which will be celebrated in 2012. Following approval of the Arizona Centennial Plan in 2007, the Arizona Department of Transportation recognized that the centennial celebration would present an

The Arizona transportation history project was conceived in anticipation of Arizona’s centennial, which will be celebrated in 2012. Following approval of the Arizona Centennial Plan in 2007, the Arizona Department of Transportation recognized that the centennial celebration would present an opportunity to inform Arizonans of the crucial role that transportation has played in the growth and development of the state.

The report consists of a historical narrative and a series of topical essays. The seven-chapter historical narrative is a history of Arizona’s highways that extends from the pre-Columbian era to the present. The 14 topical essays extend the scope of the history beyond the state’s highway system. They include overviews of the development of other transportation modes (railroads, aviation, and urban transit), a brief history of highway pavements, a lighthearted look at the motoring experience during the 1920s and 1930s, and an exploration of how changes in transportation infrastructure affected some Arizona communities. The topical essays also provide additional historical information on bridges, urban freeways, the Interstate system, ADOT and its predecessor agencies, and famous roads such as U.S. Route 66, U.S. Route 89, the Black Canyon Highway, and the Beeline Highway.

The report also includes a timeline of transportation-related developments. This chronology not only provides an accessible overview of Arizona’s transportation history; it also places that history in a larger context by including transportation-related developments from the rest of the nation and around the world. Finally, the report contains a guide to archives in Arizona that hold significant collections of historical photographs related to the state’s transportation history, a bibliography of published historical sources related to the history of highways in Arizona, and a discussion of how the historical narrative and topical essays could be used to produce publications and media that would be made available to the public.

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Created

Date Created
2011-12

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The Impact of Arizona Highways Magazine on Tourism

Description

The purpose of this study was to: 1) examine the effect of Arizona Highways Magazine (AHM) on tourism, 2) determine trip characteristics of AHM subscribers traveling in Arizona, and 3) calculate a benefit/cost ratio for AHM based on the magazine’s cost and revenues as well as the value-added economic impact.

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Created

Date Created
2012-03

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Genetic Variation of Pronghorn Across U.S. Route 89 and State Route 64

Description

This study investigated whether highways acted as barriers to gene flow for pronghorn in northern Arizona. DNA samples from 132 pronghorn were analyzed using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Samples represented animals living on opposite sides of US Route 89 (US

This study investigated whether highways acted as barriers to gene flow for pronghorn in northern Arizona. DNA samples from 132 pronghorn were analyzed using eight polymorphic microsatellite loci. Samples represented animals living on opposite sides of US Route 89 (US 89) and State Route 64 (SR 64). Two different modeling approaches indicated that both US 89 and SR 64, and to a lesser extent US Route 180 (US 180), acted as barriers to gene flow. The genetic structuring caused by highways, especially across US 89, is consistent with behavioral data that demonstrated pronghorn rarely cross this highway. This study found no evidence of inbreeding or reduced genetic variation in any of the populations examined, but those effects may take longer to appear. Based on these results, the researchers recommend future genetic monitoring of these populations or assessment of genetic variation across highways with larger traffic volumes or longer histories to determine whether the barrier effects documented here lead to loss of genetic diversity.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2012-03