James Schoenwetter joined the ASU Department of Anthropology (now School of Human Evolution and Social Change) faculty in 1967 following four years at the Laboratory of Anthropology at Santa Fe, New Mexico; he retired in 2000. His research interests were in the areas of prehistoric cultural ecology, applications of pollen analysis in archaeology, and research methodology.

Prior to retirement, he directed the department's palynology laboratory. Pollen research by Schoenwetter and his students has involved a variety of sites in Mesoamerica, North America and Europe, and continued after his retirement. He directed archaeological and botanical fieldwork in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States, California, Oaxaca, Zacatecas, Jalisco, England, and France.

Schoenwetter pioneered the study of pollen records from archaeological site-context deposits in the Southwest and Midwest in the 1960s, identified palynological evidence of Archaic Horizon maize cultivation in Arizona, Illinois and Mexico in the 1970s, and was among the earliest students of the palynological records of Historic Archaeology site-context deposits.

This collection of unpublished professional writings have not been edited since they were written between 1958 and 2004. The palynological and archaeological information they contain, and the concepts and methods presented, will prove useful to others researching similar problems and situations. These writings have not been subject to professional peer review and should not be recognized as contributions to published scientific literature.

Schoenwetter, James. Preliminary Inventory of the James Schoenwetter Papers 1956-2005.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 112
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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1967
DescriptionPollen records from two features at site LA 9200 dated by correspondence with the Colorado Plateau Pollen Chronology.
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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1967
Description

Report intended for inclusion in a volume on the archaeological salvage program undertaken in the Cahokia area of the American Bottoms under University of Illinois direction.

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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1967
Description

Pollen study of 6 surface and 11 archaeological-context samples from 2 sites of the Navajo Irrigation District salvage archaeology project. Correlation with the Colorado Plateau Pollen Chronology is consistent with ceramic dating of the sites and features sampled. Includes discussion of this and other occurrences of "Juglans."

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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1967
DescriptionPaper presented as an invited lecture to graduate students in Botany at Arizona State University. Discusses the history and outcomes of Quaternary pollen studies in the desert Southwest of the United States.
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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1967
DescriptionDiscusses the physiography, phytogeography and botany of the Valley of Oaxaca today; how effective moisture level variations are reflected in surface sample pollen records; and how prehistoric effective moisture variations are reflected in archaeological-context pollen records. Includes a supplemental report on economic pollen types observed in Archaic Period archaeological-context samples.
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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1968
DescriptionEarly version of the paper published in American Antiquity, 1974.
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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1968
Description
Paper presented at the annual meetings of the Society for American Archeology, 1968. Argues for necessity to employ an interdisciplinary methodology when archaeologists work with Natural History specialists. This demands learning to translate archaeological problems into paleobotanical research terms, and developing methods properly designed to the task(s) of resolving those

Paper presented at the annual meetings of the Society for American Archeology, 1968. Argues for necessity to employ an interdisciplinary methodology when archaeologists work with Natural History specialists. This demands learning to translate archaeological problems into paleobotanical research terms, and developing methods properly designed to the task(s) of resolving those problems.
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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1969
Description

Pilot study of the pollen of 2 modern and 7 archaeological-context sediment samples suggests larger archaeological-context samples are required for analysis but pollen preservation is not problematic.

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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1969
Description

Letter report of pollen study suggests the Colorado Plateau Pollen Chronology

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ContributorsSchoenwetter, James (Author)
Created1969
DescriptionAbstract of paper presented at the annual meetings off the Society for American Archeology, 1969. The antiquity of certain sites in north-central Wisconsin may be predicted by the character of associated forest vegetation. The data also justify paleoecological hypotheses relevant to culture historical reconstructions.